Word play…

While editing a variety of stuff… like my book, web pages, book outlines, I came across some interesting information.

Everyone is familiar with the “trilogy“… right?

Well here’s the other versions I found today…

DilogyA series of two related works

“I got a dilogy planned and plotted so that’s a valid word I can later include on my website…”

TrilogyA set of three works of art that are connected, and that can be seen either as a single work or as three individual works. They are commonly found in literature, film, or video games.

“I think most people are familiar now with Divergent series which is a perfect example of one of these.”

TetrologyA set of four works of art that are connected, and that can be seen either as a single work or as four individual works. They are commonly found in literature, film, or video games.

“Not got any of these in the list of book ideas… but it won’t stop me coming up with something…”

PentologyA set of five works of art that are connected, and that can be seen either as a single work or as five individual works. They are commonly found in literature, film, or video games.

“Something fishy here… It seems I could be looking into this in a serious way… Yes a hint!!!”

HexalogyA set of six works of art that are connected, and that can be seen either as a single work or as six individual works. They are commonly found in literature, film, or video games.

“The six expansion of the game World of Warcraft could be considered this… also a contender as a word on my website…”

 

For the following words I am quoting Wikipedia…

Heptalogy

  1. (rare) A set of seven works of art that are connected, and that can be seen either as a single work or as seven individual works. They are commonly found in literature, film, or video games.
    The Chronicles of Narnia by C. S. Lewis. In Search of Lost Time by Marcel Proust. Harry Potter by J. K. Rowling. The Dark Tower by Stephen King. “The Keys to the Kingdom” by Garth Nix.

“I think they’re missing something in that list… Oooh another hint!”

Octalogy

  1. (rare) A set of eight works of art that are connected, and that can be seen either as a single work or as eight individual works. They are commonly found in literature, film, or video games.
    • 1886
      The Shakespearean octalogy which begins with Richard II. and ends with Richard III.

Enneaology

(rare) A set of nine works of art that are connected, and that can be seen either as a single work or as eight individual works. They are commonly found in literature, film, or video games.

  • 1992, Andrew Lawrence Markus (English quoter), August Pfizmaier (German author), “Über den Text eines japanischen Drama’s” (1870), page 115, quoted in The Willow in Autumn: Ryūtei Tanehiko, 1783-1842, Harvard University Asia Center, ISBN 978-0-674-95351-2, page 76:
    These works appear, upon closer scrutiny, to be dramatic, and are actually the seventh and eighth parts of an “ennealogy” (as it were), perhaps “polylogy,” for dramas in Japan frequently are protracted to such lengths.
  • 2009, Roger Cooke, “Review of Naming Infinity”, page 11:
    George Passant, the protagonist of C.P. Snow’s second novel in the Strangers and Brothers ennealogy
  • 2011, Ralph Raab, The Tamerlane Trap, iUniverse, page 1
    Of course, nobody in their right mind would want to commit to an octalogy, ennealogy, or decalogy—or even more!— unless you were a fan of, say, Lemony Snicket

Decalogy

A set of ten works of art that are connected, and that can be seen either as a single work or as ten individual works. They are commonly found in literature, film, or video games.

“But it’s possibly just easier to say “polylogy” when there’s more than two books in a series, right…?”

That make a standalone novel an “unology“… and I can do those too…

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